Biologist Pedro Vaz Pinto’s Second Trimester 2016 Report with photos of Angola’s Cangandala Park and Luando Reserve, in English and Portuguese, now on our Giant Sable page.

In Cangandala it’s all about bulls as work continues building a new fenced sanctuary, which will be destined in the future to contain bulls for tourism visits.

Putting up a new fence

Putting up a new fence

“Inside the sanctuary the most striking records reflect a steep increase in the number of young males.”

Young males

Young males

Young calf

Young calf

Youth

Youth

A yearling male

A yearling male

“The plan eventually is to remove some of these males to the new sanctuary, as soon as it is finished.”

“The next quarter will be crucial as we are preparing for another capture operation, designed to put collars on animals in Cangandala and Luando, but also to make an updated aerial census of herds in Luando Reserve and, with assistance from military, to support anti-poaching activities also in Luando.”

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Shepherd Manuel Sacaia who patrols the Luando reserve received the Tusk Wildlife Ranger Award from Prince William for his dedicated service to protecting the giant sable.

Biologist Pedro Vaz Pinto’s First Trimester 2016 Report with photos of Angola’s Cangandala Park and Luando Reserve, in English and Portuguese, now on our Giant Sable page.

Cangandala Park buildings under the starry night

Cangandala Park buildings under the starry night

The new year in Cangandala Park saw heavy rains and flooding, thwarting efforts to access the giant sable inside the sanctuary.

“Without being able to track and monitor the animals on the ground, we had to settle with inferring the dynamics from the trap cameras’ records, keeping me busy for quite a while. As usual we obtained plenty of photos, and even after filtering the data to exclude blanks, we got around 30,000! These included the usual species, such as giant sable, roan, hybrids, bushbuck, duiker and warthogs.”

This slide show is dedicated to the night life in Cangandala. While the majority of photos recorded by the stealth cameras feature giant sable and hybrids, it’s interesting to keep track of the well known other species in the park.

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Visit our Giant Sable page to read Pedro Vaz Pinto’s full report with more photos, and previous reports.

Luanda – a rise in crime and long queues in supermarkets. But in rural Angola the people are as friendly as ever, their level of poverty has changed little, they were always poor. And the countryside is as beautiful as ever. Get out of town and experience the diversity of Angola. Then share what you have discovered with a new Facebook page, Angola Ambiente:  http://www.facebook.com/groups/1045499302182009/
The Angola Ambiente Facebook page was set up to give people the opportunity to post interesting observations on all aspects of Angolan natural history. Contributors are encouraged to post photographs and observations in order to further our knowledge of Angolan fauna and flora.

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Biologist Pedro Vaz Pinto’s Fourth Trimester 2015 Report with photos of Angola’s Cangandala Park and Luando Reserve, in English and Portuguese, now on our Giant Sable page.

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Small herd of giant sable with the bull in lead in Luando reserve.

Both Cangandala and Luando are the only two locations in the world where the Giant Sable can be found. They are protected areas yet this critically endangered mammal continues to be threatened to extinction by poachers. Here is an update from the final months of 2015.

In Cangandala Park, there’s good news and bad news. First, the bad news:

“…there had been a poaching incident with shooting involved which resulted in one of the rangers being wounded…….. “This is another sad reminder that even in Cangandala, poaching still remains a very real threat…”

The good news:

“Other than this tragic event, things seem to be going well in the sanctuary where at least the sable are breeding well and look healthy.”

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                       Lots of calves and young in Canangdala Park.

In Luando Reserve, also good news and bad news. The bad news again involving poachers:

“…..another mutilated giant sable, tragically a very young female who had been collared in 2013 when two years old, and who should now be attending her second calf. It is another animal lost for breeding, so for the population it is as good as dead.”

Palanca Report_4TRIM2015-3

Angolan air force tracking injured giant sable in Luando Reserve.

The good news:

“On a positive note, the military decided to step up their support to the shepherds in Luando reserve, making a few joint ground anti-poaching operations with ministry rangers, and subsequently deploying a few weapons to the shepherds who from now on will be better equipped to tackle the poachers.”

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Some more good news, birds and frogs continue to thrive in Cangandala Park and Luando Reserve….

 

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Visit our Giant Sable page to read Pedro Vaz Pinto’s full report and previous reports.

Biologist Pedro Vaz Pinto’s full Second Trimester 2015 Report with photos from Angola’s Cangandala Park and Luando Reserve, in English and Portuguese, is now up on our Giant Sable page.

The major defining component in the Park and Reserve during this trimester is, “grass, lots and lots of grass”.

mercury              Mercury, now you see him…

just horns         … now you don’t!

“Mercury has now fully matured, and his behaviour is what would be expected from a master bull, calmly arrogant and imposing.”

005-0027-028-1-0-Mercury marking the territory at salina 19


The birds and the bees of Cangandala National Park (slideshows)

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Survival of the fittest in the park

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And the unknown

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Visit our Giant Sable page to read Pedro Vaz Pinto’s full report and previous reports.

Paleontologists at work north of Caxito.

Paleontologists at work north of Caxito. Photo courtesy Projecto PaleoAngola.

Dinosaur footprints in diamond mines… the oldest marine turtle in Africa … a 90 million year old new species of sauropod… These are just some of the discoveries unearthed in Angola in the last decade. The Angola Field Group invites you to Ten Years of Exploring Angola’s Paleontological Heritage at the Viking Club, Thursday, August 6, at 7:45 PM, with palaeontologists Dr. Louis Jacobs of Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas and Dr. Octavio Mateus, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal. Their paleontological fieldwork, which started in May 2005, is carried out annually as part of Projecto PaleoAngola: www.paleoangola.org

Angolatitan, first dinosaur discovered in Angola, 2005. Photo courtesy Projecto PaleoAngola.

Angolatitan, first dinosaur discovered in Angola, 2005. Photo courtesy Projecto PaleoAngola.

The results of the fieldwork in Cretaceous sites in Angola has been extraordinarily spectacular with the discovery of the first dinosaurs of Angola dating from the Early Cretaceous and also the discovery of various reptiles including monosaurs, pleiosaurs, ammonites, and fossilized turtles and whales. Dr. Louis Jacobs is internationally recognized as a dinosaur expert and six fossil species have been named after him. He calls Angola a fossil museum in the ground. Dr. Octavio Mateus, also well known in his field, heads up the  Museu da Lourinha in West Portugal which houses an extensive collection of paleontological specimen.

Angola field group guest presenter Dr. Louis Jacobs.

Angola field group guest presenter Dr. Louis Jacobs. Photo courtesy Projecto PaleoAngola.

Everybody is welcome to attend. In close cooperation with the Viking Club, this event is offered free of charge. The talk will be in English. Beverages and snacks are sold at the Viking Bar which opens at 7:15 PM. Coupons must be purchased. You can download a map showing the location of the Viking Club on our Join Us page. The Viking Club is on the main floor of Edificio Maianga, Rua Marien Nguabi, No 118 in Maianga, across the street from the Panela de Barra restaurant.

For Sale: Photo books, Natural Medicine books and other books about Angola and Huambo Dolls.

Less than 3% of small farms have land deeds.

Less than 3% of small farms have land deeds (photo courtesy Tobias)

Rural land ownership in Angola has always been complex, from the time that the Bantu forced out traditional hunter gatherers, to when the Portuguese moved thousands of Angolans from their traditional lands, to present day questionable land acquisitions by various vested interests. Today, less than 3% of small scale Angolan farmers have deeds for their land. The Angola Field Group invites you to hear What’s Happening to Angola’s Rural Land? at the Viking Club, Thursday July 23 at 7:45 PM.

Most land is held communally with the soba in charge or is owned by the state (photo courtesy  S. Borges)

Most land is held communally with the soba in charge or is owned by the state (photo courtesy S. Borges)

Our presenter, Paulo Filipe, born in Luanda, published his book Nós e a Nossa Terra, in March this year. He graduated from the Africa University in Zimbabwe in 1994 with a major in Agriculture and Natural Resources. He has also studied in the USA and in South Africa but his main interest remains researching the pursuit of ensuring that all Angolans are able to access sufficient, affordable and nutritious food.

Food security is a looming issue in southern Africa

Food security is a looming issue in southern Africa (photo credit S. Borges)

Everybody is welcome to attend. In close cooperation with the Viking Club, this event is offered free of charge. The talk will be in English. Beverages and snacks are sold at the Viking Bar which opens at 7:15 PM. Coupons must be purchased. You can download a map showing the location of the Viking Club on our Join Us page. The Viking Club is on the main floor of Edificio Maianga, Rua Marien Nguabi, No 118 in Maianga, across the street from the Panela de Barra restaurant.

 Do all Angolans have access to affordable and nutritious food?

Do all Angolans have access to affordable and nutritious food?