Dr. Tim Kubacki is a medical mission doctor who has been serving rural Angola since 2012. He talks about COVID and how the media sensationalism surrounding it has raised questions and fears even in the small rural community that his clinic and hospital serve in Cavango in the central part of Angola.

Cavango health care facility staff meeting (half of the room only).

People in rural Angola are severely afraid and shouldn’t be. They face far more dangerous killers every day, which, for them, have no treatment (malaria, pneumonia, diarrhea, TB, HIV, hepatitis, meningitis, childbirth deaths, measles, heart failure, asthma, etc) and do not fear them. But with these other illnesses, they don’t have the media constantly in their face, as they do with COVID, screaming,“Be afraid!”

Young boy with skin TB treated at the Cavango hospital.

A critical teen with TB, pneumonia and malaria hospitalized.

Young pregnant 23-year-old woman came to clinic suffering from disseminated TB, severe malnourishment and new onset diabetes.

Read Dr. Tim’s blog post about COVID and sensationalism here.

Dr. Tim Kubacki writes about the drought he sees in SE Angola while working in the province of Cuando Cubango. He’s a medical mission doctor who has been serving rural Angola since 2012, we wrote about him here.

Patients in line waiting to see Dr. Tim.

“We were dropped off by MAF [Mission Aviation Fellowship] pilot Marijn, who has been making food flights for the past months to this region to try to make a dent in the famine. He was accompanied by a man from National Geographic who had just driven up to this part of Angola through Botswana, from South Africa. He’s been traveling this region of Africa since he was a kid, some 40 years ago, and he said he has never seen a drought this bad in Botswana, Namibia and Angola. He passed carcasses of elephants, Oryx, Kudu, Hippos and much more. He said every time he stopped and stepped outside of his car, he smelled death on the wind. He said the Oryx are so hardy and he has never seen one starve to death and on this trip he saw many Oryx carcasses.”

Sacks of corn and medical boxes off-loaded in Jamba, Cuando Cubango.

“I’ve seen many patients (perhaps the majority) with heart rates over 100 with complaints of generalized weakness and pain. I’ve smelled ketosis on the breath of so many. Virtually everyone is markedly dehydrated. I gave a talk on nutrition during famine one morning before clinic and one woman spoke up while virtually everyone nodded in agreement when she said, “We just don’t have food.” Almost everyone I saw this week in Rivungo [a town in Cuando Cubango] is in a state of mild to severe starvation.”

After the sacks of corn are loaded from plane to car, every kernel is picked up.

See Dr. Tim’s blog with photos at: kubackisinangola.com

Cavango clinic/hospital.

Dr. Tim Kubacki is a medical mission doctor who has been serving rural Angola since 2012.

He is based in Cavango, “a small, rural village of about 500 people that was a mission village before 1976, especially housing and treating people with Leprosy. In 1976, all 250 Lepers were slaughtered during the civil war and the villagers scattered, many walking with a group of more than 5000 people on a pilgrimage to a refugee camp in Zambia (a nine month trek through the wilderness) until the war ended in 2002. The people of Cavango and those in the surrounding villages have since begun to repopulate the area and continue to live simply, in simple stick and mud homes with grass roofs, without electricity and running water, via subsistence living, farming by hand and raising animals for food. Many in the village have never been to the city as transportation is mainly by foot (about a week’s walk to the closest city).”

Dr. Tim regularly travels by air with Mission Aviation Fellowship Angola (MAF) to remote communities that have no access to health care. Around Cavango his clinic has placed motorbike trailers in villages to bring in unconscious patients.

Village ambulance with patient inside arriving at the clinic.

See his blog with photos at kubackisinangola.com