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Luanda is Celebrating its 444th Birthday! Here are two special events you can attend – a free photo exhibition and a music concert that will take you back to the roots of popular Angolan instrumental music. Alliance Francaise invites you…

Exposição “Boda no meu Kubiko” de Ngoi Salucombo: O fotógrafo angolano Ngoi Salucombo apresenta no dia 24 de Janeiro de 2020 as 18:30 na Casa Rede a exposição BODA NO MEU KUBIKO. É uma exposição fotográfica que apresentar-se como uma mostra em live performance, com a finalidade de expor uma visão o mais próximo da realidade, a vivencia de uma família num prédio situado no centro de Luanda. A exposição ficará aberta ao público de 24 de Janeiro a 24 de Fevereiro de 2020, na Casa Rede, Avenida Hoji Ya Henda (antiga Avenida Brasil), nº47, 6º andar. Entrada grátis.


1º Concerto de Música Popular Urbana Angolana Instrumental – O evento terá lugar no dia 25 de Janeiro de 2020, pelas 18h00, no palco do Clube Naval de Luanda, e contará com a participação de uma «elite» de artistas de uma geração vanguardista da música popular urbana angolana de raiz, entre os quais se destacam os solistas, que vão revisitar o grande legado de exímios executantes da música instrumental de Angola.

A DISCO DE VINIL,LDA, mentora e conceptora do Projecto Memória Patrimonial do Cancioneiro Angolano — no âmbito do qual se irá realizar o I.º Concerto de Música Popular Urbana Angolana Instrumental —, é uma editora em fase de construção que vai dedicar todo o seu esforço na pesquisa, promoção e produção da música angolana de raiz, com maior incidência para o Semba, género musical do qual a DISCO DE VINIL, LDA será a sua porta-bandeira. Ingresso : 10.000 Kz. Venda de ingressos no Chá de Caxinde. Tel : 927 75 75 35 / 990 75 75 35.

Dr. Tim Kubacki writes about the drought he sees in SE Angola while working in the province of Cuando Cubango. He’s a medical mission doctor who has been serving rural Angola since 2012, we wrote about him here.

Patients in line waiting to see Dr. Tim.

“We were dropped off by MAF [Mission Aviation Fellowship] pilot Marijn, who has been making food flights for the past months to this region to try to make a dent in the famine. He was accompanied by a man from National Geographic who had just driven up to this part of Angola through Botswana, from South Africa. He’s been traveling this region of Africa since he was a kid, some 40 years ago, and he said he has never seen a drought this bad in Botswana, Namibia and Angola. He passed carcasses of elephants, Oryx, Kudu, Hippos and much more. He said every time he stopped and stepped outside of his car, he smelled death on the wind. He said the Oryx are so hardy and he has never seen one starve to death and on this trip he saw many Oryx carcasses.”

Sacks of corn and medical boxes off-loaded in Jamba, Cuando Cubango.

“I’ve seen many patients (perhaps the majority) with heart rates over 100 with complaints of generalized weakness and pain. I’ve smelled ketosis on the breath of so many. Virtually everyone is markedly dehydrated. I gave a talk on nutrition during famine one morning before clinic and one woman spoke up while virtually everyone nodded in agreement when she said, “We just don’t have food.” Almost everyone I saw this week in Rivungo [a town in Cuando Cubango] is in a state of mild to severe starvation.”

After the sacks of corn are loaded from plane to car, every kernel is picked up.

See Dr. Tim’s blog with photos at: kubackisinangola.com

Download the 2018 Annual Report of the Angolan Association for Birds and Nature (Associação Angolana Para Aves e Natureza), in English with a brief summary in Portuguese, compiled by Michael Mills, on bird conservation and research activities in Angola. Click here to download the six-page PDF.


Visit this website’s Birds page here to read more materials about birds in Angola, including past annual reports by the Angolan Association for Birds and Nature.


Now available online, South West Angola: a portrait of land and life, click here to download a PDF of the book. This is the most informative book published to date about southwest Angola, covering the provinces of Namibe, Cunene and Huíla, written in both English and Portuguese, by the Namibian father-daughter team of John and Stephie Mendelsohn.

This comprehensive book brims with images, maps, graphs and charts that capture the faces, spaces and places of the great open landscapes that makes up Southwest Angola, like this magnificent tree, purported to be the world’s largest baobab, which grows north of Xangongo.

 

Cavango clinic/hospital.

Dr. Tim Kubacki is a medical mission doctor who has been serving rural Angola since 2012.

He is based in Cavango, “a small, rural village of about 500 people that was a mission village before 1976, especially housing and treating people with Leprosy. In 1976, all 250 Lepers were slaughtered during the civil war and the villagers scattered, many walking with a group of more than 5000 people on a pilgrimage to a refugee camp in Zambia (a nine month trek through the wilderness) until the war ended in 2002. The people of Cavango and those in the surrounding villages have since begun to repopulate the area and continue to live simply, in simple stick and mud homes with grass roofs, without electricity and running water, via subsistence living, farming by hand and raising animals for food. Many in the village have never been to the city as transportation is mainly by foot (about a week’s walk to the closest city).”

Dr. Tim regularly travels by air with Mission Aviation Fellowship Angola (MAF) to remote communities that have no access to health care. Around Cavango his clinic has placed motorbike trailers in villages to bring in unconscious patients.

Village ambulance with patient inside arriving at the clinic.

See his blog with photos at kubackisinangola.com

The International Crane Foundation conducted an aerial survey of Cameia National Park in Moxico and the surrounding Bulozi Plain of Angola, a massive fresh water floodplain, and discovered three new breeding grounds for Wattled Cranes.

Wattled Crane families, one of the newly discovered populations.

Wattled Crane habitat on the Bulozi Plain.

Click here to download a PDF version of the August 2018 issue of the Foundation’s publication, The Bugle.

Angolan reed frog, endemic to Angola

The Angolan Escarpment is the least known and studied part of the African Great Escarpment. Urgent research is required to protect and conserve Angola’s threatened biodiversity. Several observatories have been implemented throughout Angola including one in the southern escarpment in Tundavala.

A recent study states that despite this area’s stunning landscape that is home to several endemics, Tundavala “lacks official national protected status and is threatened by increasing human activities, especially logging and burning for charcoal production and the harvesting of natural resources such as medicinal plants and rocks for building purposes. Increasing numbers of villagers inhabit the region with their livestock (cows and goats) and plant crops. Other threats include man-made fires and the dumping of rubble and domestic, commercial, and even medical waste.”

As part of this study on Biodiversity and Ecology by Hamburg University, you can now download a special report titled Amphibians and reptiles of the Tundavala region of the Angolan Escarpment, by researchers Ninda Baptista, Telmo António, and William R. Branch. Click here for the PDF.

(Baptista, N., António, T. & Branch, W.R. (2018) Amphibians and reptiles of the Tundavala region of the Angolan Escarpment. In: Climate change and adaptive land management in southern Africa – assessments, changes, challenges, and solutions (ed. by Revermann, R., Krewenka, K.M., Schmiedel, U., Olwoch, J.M., Helmschrot, J. & Jürgens, N.), pp. 397-403, Biodiversity & Ecology, 6, Klaus Hess Publishers, Göttingen & Windhoek. doi:10.7809/b-e.00351). Photos taken from the article.

Ansorge’s whip snake, endemic to Angola

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