Now available to download, 2014 Annual Report of the Angolan Association for Birds and Nature, in English and in Portuguese.

Click to download PDF.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD PDF.

This year saw good progress with our two main projects: at Mount Moco tree planting was accelerated and the nursery expanded, and 80 fuel efficient stoves were finally delivered to the community at Kanjonde, to reduce their reliance on fire wood.

A highlight of the year was delivering 80 fuel efficient stoves for the families at Kanjonde.

A highlight of the year was delivering 80 fuel efficient stoves for the families at Kanjonde.

At Kumbira, a forest in Kwanza Sul province, seven weeks of field study were undertaken by Aimy Cáceres and colleagues, where a detailed study of Gabela Akalat range sizes and habitat use was undertaken, and tree biomass evaluated.

Aimy Cáceres radio tracking (left) a tagged Gabela Akalat (right).

Aimy Cáceres radio tracking (left) a tagged Gabela Akalat (right).

Additionally, good progress was made with the registration of the Associação Angolana para Aves e Natureza (the Angolan Association for Birds and Nature) with the registration certificate now issued. Other highlights? The bilingual book on The Common Birds of Luanda was completed and will be launched with the launch this year, 2015, of the NGO.  Several peer-reviewed publications were produced.

Angolan trained staff work in teams removing dangerous items from minefields

Angolan trained staff work in teams removing dangerous items from minefields

The Angola Field Group has been invited to visit Moxico province, where MAG (Mines Advisory Group), a demining organization, is headquartered. MAG has been in Angola since 1994. Moxico is the largest and most land mine contaminated province in the country. It is also home to many former refugees who continue to return and build their lives next to minefields and in close proximity to other explosive remnants of war (ERW).

Building next to minefields.

Building next to minefields

MAG has found and removed 30,000 mines and ERW since 2002, clearing and releasing over 80 million square meters of land for use in agriculture, housing, schools and clinics. With over 400 minefields still in Moxico it is expected that it will take 20-30 more years at the current rate to complete clearance.

Dates and schedule of trip:

Day 1, Friday November 7
-arrive at Luanda domestic airport at 4 for 5AM take-off with national carrier TAAG
– 0615 Arrive at Luena, the capital city of Moxico. MAG will pick up and deliver participants to hotel. Time for rest and wash up
– 1130 Presentation and view of MAG’s base
– 1230 Lunch
– 1400 Detector methodologies and ordnance identification
– 1600 Hotel
 
Day 2, Saturday November 8
-0600 Depart to field locations
-0830 Field brief
-0900/1100 minefield visit (in small groups)
– 1130/1230 mine risk education session
– 1300 visit MAG campsite, about 133km from Luena, near Lucusse, the place where UNITA rebel leader Jonas Savimbi was killed in 2002 and buried.
-1330/ 1500 return to Luena
– 1500/ 1700 rest
-1700 BBQ
 
Day 3, Sunday, November 9
-0540 Depart for airport with MAG
-0845 Arrive Luanda
(there are daily flights to Luanda so if participants want to stay longer and return on Monday this would be possible)
 
Participants will be responsible for purchasing TAAG flight tickets and transport to the Luanda airport. MAG will book the hotel rooms but each participant is responsible for paying for their room, meals, etc. MAG will pick up from and take participants back, to the airport in Luena.

If you have questions or want to sign up for this field trip, please send an email to:  angolafieldgroup@gmail.com  – if you want to sign up include your name, nationality (that appears on passport if applicable) and telephone number.

Foreigners must travel with valid passport and visa.

The hotels are about $120/ room for bed and breakfast
Flights are $330 return
BBQ and expenses $50 – $70

 Risk education, teaching villagers how to protect themselves and their families

Risk education, teaching villagers how to protect themselves and their families


     Click here to download the MAG brochure in full size.

More than a third of Luandans do not have access to drinking water. The Angola Field Group had a good attendance last week as over 160 participants listened to Development Workshop (DW) director and founder, Allan Cain, as he told us about the serious challenges of Community Water Management. An audio recording of the presentation and PowerPoint are now on DW’s website at: www.dw.angonet.org/forumitem/1429

DW, together with the government, developed a policy of community management of water as part of the Angolan Government’s Water for All Program, called “MoGeCA”. MoGeCA promotes an approach involving local communities in the planning, construction and management of water points, as a basic strategy promoting local development. It aims to improve water supply to the population in a way that each actor promotes the sustainability and maintenance of water supplies.

A MoGeCA book has been published and printed as result of DW´s more than 30 years working in the water sector, together with government structures. The book is a manual on Community Water Management and has become the Angolan National Policy on sustainable water management. Download a PDF (in Portuguese) from DW’s website: dw.angonet.org/sites/default/files/online_lib_files/AGUA-MoGeCa_0.pdf

Training cards have been made to use in communities during campaigns and social mobilizing events. These cards work with drawings and are used in combination with community theater, to spread knowledge on (social) hygiene, water management and waste management. Download a PDF at dw.angonet.org/sites/default/files/2012%20MANUAL%20MoGeca.pdf

Mr. Cain also showed two short videos, a short video about Alice, a mother who watches her children play in dirty rain water on the street while inside her home there is not a drop of clean water for drinking: www.youtube.com/watch?list=UUW67t6I7C27Ycc6XW2Q29Cg&v=AiB_Ivg4c3k

The second short video shows DW´s work in Angola on the water access points they built that benefit over one million Angolans:

Having to walk up to 100 meters to get a bucket of water from a standpost, is considered adequate water coverage according to the Angolan Institute of Statistics. Photo courtesy DW.

Having to walk up to 100 meters to get a bucket of water from a standpost is considered adequate water coverage according to the Angolan Institute of Statistics. Photo courtesy Development Workshop.

More that a third of Luandans do not have access to drinking water. The informal water market in Luanda, pumping river water into water trucks to sell and then re-sell in city bairros, brings in more than 250 million dollars a year, according to a recent study by Development Workshop (DW), a local NGO that has been working in Angola for 34 years. The Angola Field Group invites you to take a closer look at the serious challenges of Community Water Management with DW Director and founder, Allan Cain, Thursday, August 28 at 7:45 PM (please note our new starting time) at the Viking Club. Mr. Cain, an architect, urban planner, and international speaker, will be launching two new videos as part of his presentation. Development Workshop has been working for the last several years with the Ministry of Water and Energy on the development of a new national “Community Water Strategy”.

Pumping stations taking water out of the Bengo River to be loaded into waiting water  trucks.

Pumping stations taking water out of the Bengo River to be loaded into waiting water trucks.

Everybody is welcome to attend. In close cooperation with the Viking Club, this event is offered free of charge. Beverages and snacks are sold at the Viking Bar which opens at 7:15 PM. Coupons must be purchased.

 For Sale: Hand woven baskets from the Zambezi Women’s Cooperative as well as books about Angola, and artisanal rock salt from the interior of Quicama National Park.    

 You can download a map showing the location of the Viking Club on our Join Us page. The Viking Club is on the main floor of Edificio Maianga, Rua Marien Nguabi, No 118 in Maianga, across the street from the Panela de Barra restaurant.

There are various types of water standposts to service communities. Photo courtesy Tako Koning.

There are various types of water standposts to service communities. Photo courtesy Tako Koning.

ADDENDUM

Development Workshop has been working for the last several years with the Ministry of Water and Energy on the development of a new national “Community Water Strategy” called MoGeCA. The policy was developed as part of the Angolan Government’s Water for All Program. MoGeCA promotes an approach involving local communities in the planning, construction and management of water points, as a basic strategy promoting local development. Community management is defined here as a form of cooperation between the community and the government – local authorities and the Provincial Directorate of Energy and Water (DPEA) – or local water companies. It aims to improve water supply to the population in a way that each actor promotes the sustainability and maintenance of water supplies.

A MOGECA book has been published and printed as result of DW´s more than 30 years working in the water sector, together with government structures. The book is a manual on Community Water Management and has become the Angolan National Policy on sustainable water management. Each book comes with a set of cards to be used at training to explain the target groups how to reach sustainable water and waste management in their communities. Download a copy (in Portuguese) on DW’s website at dw.angonet.org/content/books-dw.

Allan Cain is an architect and specialist in project planning, urban development. He has a degree in Environmental Studies, did his graduate studies at the Architectural Association (London, UK) and further specialist studies at Harvard Business School and Bolder, Colorado (in Microfinance and Housing Finance). He has over 35 years of professional experience in developing countries, many of those in conflict and post-conflict Angola. He has worked as a consultant and lead research projects for the World Bank, UN Habitat the European Union and other international organisations. He has lectured at universities in Canada, China, Angola, Norway, USA, South Africa and UK. He is the director of Development Workshop and a member of the boards of several development institutions. His articles and papers have been published widely in international journals. He is co-founder and president of KixiCrédito, Angola’s first non-bank microfinance institution and has pioneered housing micro-finance in Angola and is currently a member of the international board of directors of BPD Water and Sanitation, representing the civil-society sector.

DW is engaged as a critical partner in the Angolan Government’s decentralisation programme in the areas of municipal participatory planning and land tenure reform. Their current program in Angola has parallel focuses; on peri-urban communities where the provision of infrastructure, basic services and community economic development remains a serious challenge, and on supporting the rehabilitation of social infrastructure and supporting the processes of settlement and social infrastructure for communities in the central highlands and the provinces of Cabinda and Luanda. With more than  three decades of research and practice in Angola, DW has been able to offer lessons for replication and influencing public policy in sectors of land tenure, housing, water supply and poverty reduction.

Musseques, informal housing, also called slums or shantytowns.

Musseques, informal housing, also called slums or shantytowns.

Almost three quarters of the people in Luanda live in musseques, the peri-urban informal settlements which sprung up as safe havens for those fleeing the war. What are the challenges and problems facing the musseques where today the birth rate is higher than ever? The Angola Field group invites you to a presentation, “Musseques, from Survival Strategies to Sustainable Development”, at the Viking Club, Thursday April 10, at 8:00 PM with Willy Piassa, a Community Development Specialist with Development Workshop, a local NGO that has worked in Angola since 1981. Willy has been the Senior Manager of the Luanda Urban Poverty Program and has wide experience building the capacity of Angolan civil society organizations. He graduated from the University of South Africa and completed Postgraduate studies in Governance at the University of Glasgow.

  Less than half the households have on-site sanitation. Photo courtesy DW.

Less than half the households have on-site sanitation. Photo courtesy DW.

Everybody is welcome to attend. In close cooperation with the Viking Club, this event is offered free of charge. Beverages and snacks are sold at the Viking Bar which opens at 7:30 PM. Coupons must be purchased. For Sale: Natural honey and home made peanut butter from the Mutti Farm in Moxico. Handwoven baskets from the Zambezi Women’s Cooperative as well as books about Angola, and Natural Medicine including Artemesia Tea from ANAMED Bie.

Less than 30% of Luandans have access to running water in their homes. Photo courtesy DW.

Less than 30% of Luandans have access to running water in their homes. Photo courtesy DW.

You can download a map showing the location of the Viking Club on our Join Us page. The Viking Club is on the main floor of Edificio Maianga,  Rua Marien Nguabi, No 118 in Maianga, across the street from the Panela de Barra restaurant.

Photo courtesy DW.

Luanda musseque. Photo courtesy DW.

Cleaning up the remnants of war so life can get back to normal for all

Cleaning up the remnants of war so life can get back to normal for all.

On April 4th Angola celebrated 11 years of peace. April 4th is also International Day for Mine Awareness. Long after the war is over, some weapons wait underground for years, a lurking threat. As one of the world’s most heavily land-mined countries, Angola still has over a decade of de-mining ahead of it. The Angola Field Group invites you to “Surviving the Peace, Angola”, a short film about an Angolan girl who played with a landmine; the film gives a close-up look at de-mining in Moxico province, at the Viking Club, Thursday April 11, at 8:00 PM.

Wearing a helmet and visor and heavy vest and working one knee on the ground, makes de-mining especially challenging in hot climates like Angola.

Wearing a helmet and visor and heavy vest and working one knee on the ground, makes de-mining especially challenging in hot climates like Angola.

Our presenter, Tony Fernandes, is Technical Operations Manager/ Senior Manager in Country for MAG Angola, the NGO de-mining in Moxico province which is one of two most contaminated provinces in the country. Previously he managed de-mining work in Iran, DRC, South Sudan and Vietnam. Besides humanitarian mine action, Tony has extensive experience working in anti-terrorism and as a bomb squad operator and explosives inspector.

The presentation will also include a short informative talk on de-mining in Angola in addition to the film, and an opportunity to ask questions of our presenter, Tony Fernandes. Also MAG T-shirts will be on sale.

A lethal threat in his own backyard. A resident shows MAG de-mining team a landmine

A lethal threat in his own backyard. A resident shows MAG de-mining team a landmine.

In close cooperation with the Viking Club, this event is offered free of charge. Beverages and snacks are sold at the bar, coupons must be purchased. The Viking Bar opens at 7:30 PM. The Viking Club is on the main floor of the Edificio Maianga, Rua Marien N”Guabi, No 118 across from Panela da Barro, on the same side of the street as the Suite Hotel. For a map, click here. For sale on Thursday, hand woven baskets from Moxico and various Angolan books. Also, giant used book sale of various English titles, fiction and non-fiction, a great selection!

Moxico resident stares at yellow stick marking a landmine, a treacherous war souvenir in front of his house

Moxico resident stares at yellow stick marking a landmine, a treacherous war souvenir in front of his house.

MAG, Mines Advisory Group, is a British-based Non Governmental Organization based in Manchester, UK, founded in 1989 and has had de-mining operations in over 35 countries.

An important component of mine action is teaching mine awareness

An important component of mine action is teaching mine awareness.

MAG team  de-mining next to veranda of a local school in Moxico

MAG team  de-mining next to veranda of a local school in Moxico. All photos courtesy MAG.

 

Miss Angola participating in the national vaccination campaign. Photo courtesy Africare/CORE Group.

Despite eradication efforts, the debilitating polio virus continues to infect thousands of individuals every year.  Although India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan have witnessed the largest resurgence of recent cases, Africa has also seen the continuing persistence of the virus, particularly in Angola.  Almost declared polio-free in the early 2000’s, Angola has unfortunately seen an increase in the number of reported cases over the past few years. The present polio outbreak in Angola is a serious risk to the neighbouring countries and also an acute challenge to the global polio eradication effort with the World Health Organization classifying the outbreak as an emergency.

On Thursday, March 24th, the Angola Field Group invites you to a presentation given by Africare’s Country Director, Christian Isely, and Africare’s Program Director, Dr. Peter Wirsiy. With over forty years of experience implementing development and humanitarian projects in over thirty five African countries and over twenty years of experience working in Angola, Africare (www.africare.org) is currently playing a lead role in combating the spread of polio in the provinces of Luanda, Zaire, and Kwanza Sul.  In coordination with USAID, the Gates Foundation, UNICEF, the CORE Group, the Salvation Army, Catholic Relief Services, Save the Children, and World Vision, Africare is ramping up efforts to increase vaccine coverage.  Come learn about this dreadful disease, the epidemic in Angola, and the current drive to finally eliminate it from the country.

Everybody is welcome to attend. The talk will be in English. In close cooperation with the Viking Club, this event is offered free of charge. Alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and snacks are sold at the bar, coupons must be purchased. The Viking Bar opens at 7:30 PM! You can download a map showing the location of the Viking Club on this website’s Join Us page. The Viking Club is on the main floor of the former Swedish Building at Rua Marien N”Guabi, No 118 in Maianga, across the street from the new Panela de Barra restaurant.

Community volunteers vaccinating a child. Photo courtesy Africare/CORE Group.