… “It’s a fact: the hybrids are capable of breeding!”

 

Visit our Giant Sable page to read Biologist Pedro Vaz Pinto’s latest news updates with photos from Cangandala Park, in English and Portuguese. Also, the latest article  ‘Angola’s Giant Sable Makes A Triumphant Comeback’  in the Fall 2010 issue of SWARA, the East African Wildlife Society’s Journal.


The generous seasonal rains have made significantly more difficult to access Cangandala, but this has also allowed the vegetation to recover, and the park is now dominated by different shades of green. As the woodland presents itself lush and moist, there is plenty of food for our herd inside the 400ha sanctuary. The animals seem to graze happily, and not being forced to move much every day inside the fenced area. The nine females keep together as a group and always diligently led by the bull. Whenever we approach he will watch and stare at us while the females stay relaxed.

Picture of staring palanca (giant sable) bull

So far so good. It is a very good sign, that up until early March, no female has shown signs of advanced pregnancy or calving. If that was the case, it would have meant that they would produce a hybrid calf, as there wasn’t enough time to blame it on the new bull! All we have to do now is wait a bit longer, as before June we don’t expect any calves.

Cangandala National Park, lush and green thanks to seasonal rains.

Visit our Giant Sable page to read Biologist Pedro Vaz Pinto latest news updates with photos from Cangandala Park, in English and Portugese.

 

Now finally, the first public presentation in English showing the exciting results of the three-week Giant Sable Capture Operation recently completed in Cangandala National Park, home of Angola’s famous but critically endangered antelope known locally as the palanca negra, Thursday, October 15 at 8:00 PM, at the Viking Club.

Pedro Vaz Pinto checks a giant sable male darted during the Capture Operation. Photo courtesy Barni O'Hara.

Pedro Vaz Pinto checks a giant sable male darted during the Capture Operation.                                                                    Photo courtesy Barni O’Hara.

Our guest presenters are Pedro Vaz Pinto, Environmental Advisor for the Catholic University Centre for Scientific Studies and Research, and Project Assistant, Biologist Sendi Baptista. For the past seven years Pedro Vaz Pinto has been trying to prove that the giant sable, which exists nowhere else in the world except in the province of Malange did indeed survive civil war, and more recently, cross breeding, and poaching. To see a map of Malange and for more information and photos, scroll down or visit our Giant Sable page by clicking on the link in the menu above or just click here.

Male giant sable being collared for future trackingPhoto courtesy Barni O'Hara.

Male giant sable being collared for future tracking. Photo courtesy Barni O’Hara.

Everybody is welcome to attend this presentation which will be in English. In close cooperation with the Viking Club, this event is offered free of charge. If you would like to have a map showing the location of the Viking Club, click here.  It is on the main floor of the Predio Maianga at Rua Marien N”Guabi, No 118 in Maianga, across the street from the new Panela de Barra restaurant.

Excited villagers gather around military helicopter translocating a male giant sable. Photo courtesy Barni O'Hara.

Excited villagers gather around military helicopter translocating a male giant sable. Read details on Giant Sable link, above. Photo courtesy Barni O’Hara.

On Thursday, April 24, at 8:00pm at the Viking Club, The Angola Field Group invites you to ‘Traveling the Angolan Road’. This travelogue takes you north to M’banza Congo through the province of Zaire, across into Uige and then further east to the famous sights of Malange province. Complete with maps, historical details and set to the beat of Angolan music, German diplomat and life-long nomad Thomas Weber has compiled a presentation that shows part of the 8000 kilometers he has travelled alone through the country since arriving here in 2005 to work for the German Embassy. This is your chance to get tips for the trips you’re planning in-country!

Also take advantage of pre-show shopping at the Angolan Bazaar. You can purchase colourful placemats, napkins and aprons sewn from African prints with proceeds going to an orphanage. Hand made dolls, pine cone birds as well as grown-in-Angola soya by the Huambo women’s cooperative will be on sale, plus Irma Dominga’s shoulder bags that are crocheted with recycled bottle tabs. Kissonde, the popular cartoon book and more books on Angola published by NGOs in English will be available as well.

Everybody is welcome to attend this evening. In close cooperation with the Viking Club, this event is offered free of charge. Alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages are sold at the bar, $3.00 each. Drink coupons available. For a map and directions click here.

Heading north to the Congo border Trusty Pajero perched on a Pedra Negra

Traveling north to the Congo and a trusty Pajero perched on a Pedra Negra. Photos by Thomas Weber.