Less than 3% of small farms have land deeds.

Less than 3% of small farms have land deeds (photo courtesy Tobias)

Rural land ownership in Angola has always been complex, from the time that the Bantu forced out traditional hunter gatherers, to when the Portuguese moved thousands of Angolans from their traditional lands, to present day questionable land acquisitions by various vested interests. Today, less than 3% of small scale Angolan farmers have deeds for their land. The Angola Field Group invites you to hear What’s Happening to Angola’s Rural Land? at the Viking Club, Thursday July 23 at 7:45 PM.

Most land is held communally with the soba in charge or is owned by the state (photo courtesy  S. Borges)

Most land is held communally with the soba in charge or is owned by the state (photo courtesy S. Borges)

Our presenter, Paulo Filipe, born in Luanda, published his book Nós e a Nossa Terra, in March this year. He graduated from the Africa University in Zimbabwe in 1994 with a major in Agriculture and Natural Resources. He has also studied in the USA and in South Africa but his main interest remains researching the pursuit of ensuring that all Angolans are able to access sufficient, affordable and nutritious food.

Food security is a looming issue in southern Africa

Food security is a looming issue in southern Africa (photo credit S. Borges)

Everybody is welcome to attend. In close cooperation with the Viking Club, this event is offered free of charge. The talk will be in English. Beverages and snacks are sold at the Viking Bar which opens at 7:15 PM. Coupons must be purchased. You can download a map showing the location of the Viking Club on our Join Us page. The Viking Club is on the main floor of Edificio Maianga, Rua Marien Nguabi, No 118 in Maianga, across the street from the Panela de Barra restaurant.

 Do all Angolans have access to affordable and nutritious food?

Do all Angolans have access to affordable and nutritious food?